Mama and baby bear cub pin

If you’ve been following my blog, you already know my favorite figurals are Christmas tree pins and snowflakes, but one that is nearest and dearest to my heart is my mama and baby bear cub pin, which I wear on my coat in honor of my sweet son, Chauncey, who will soon be turning 8 years old.   My dear Italian friend, Chiara, who resides in London, England, started calling my son my “little cub”, so when I found this pin, I just had to have it.

Another favorite of mine is the Art Deco sterling and enamel cornucopia I wear on my sweater for the Thanksgiving Day holiday.  It is rather detailed and gorgeous in cornflower blue, with sapphire blue, carnelian red and yellow blossoms, decorated with sparkly marcasite stones.

Figurals can be worn on a sweater, blouse, dress, coat lapel, purse or belt.  If you’re worried about pin marks, there are brooch converters that will slide over the pin and attach to a magnet behind your clothes so that no stick pin marks are necessary.  I got mine on Ebay, but there are several online sellers who have them, either in silver plate, gold plate or sterling silver.

Figurals take many interesting shapes: Butterflies, insects, flowers, hearts, animals, letters, fish, leaves, frogs, turtles (as well as trees and snowflakes, of course) are my favorites.  One of my holy grails is to acquire one of Trifari’s sterling silver “jelly bellies”, but since they usually are rather expensive, it might take me a while to snag one!  I’ll be showcasing some of my collection and my wish list in my next post!

Art Deco sterling & enamel cornucopia brooch

Corocraft's "Twisted Trunk" tree pin

Corocraft spawned from Coro, one of the most well-known costume jewelry companies in America.  They were known for pretty and affordable jewelry for all women, sold in five and dime stores, as well as specialty boutiques.  Their best pieces have been said to be made between the 1930’s-1950’s, of which one of their higher end lines, Corocraft, was produced after 1937. 

Corocraft evergreen

The name Coro came from the first two letters of the company partners and founders last names, Cohn (Emmanuel) and Rosenberg (Gerard).  Their small shop in New York grew into an empire that employed a work force of more than 2,000. 

Although better known for their duettes, jelly belly lucite pieces and tremblers, Coro/Corocraft produced one of the finest Christmas tree pin designs ever created.  It was rendered in shiny, texutred gold tone with clear rhinestones pave set in a diamond weave pattern, 3D cone with a twisted thread trunk, which was duplicated in color schemes of green/clear, pink/clear, and a multi-color version of pink/green/blue/clear. 

Corocraft pretty in pink

Corocraft multi-color tree

For each color scheme, Corocraft also produced matching earrings for these tree pins (See photos). I love these trees so much that I have them all, all color schemes and with their matching earrings!

A rarer tree copied their faux pearl swirl circle pin.  In my previous article, I featured their battery-powered, light up Christmas tree pins.  The American based Coro jewelry company ceased production in 1979, but Coro Inc. in Canada is still in operation today.

Stay Tuned for next article:  Snowflake brooches!

Corocraft faux pearl circle brooch

Corocraft faux pearl holiday arbor

Corocraft matching tree earrings on original card

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Corocraft battery powered tree, "at rest"

Vintage Christmas tree pins with battery compartments that are not corroded are a beautiful and somewhat rare thing, especially when a little round battery lights them up!  I have had a few Corocraft and one Hattie Carnegie battery-powered tree.  All the Corocraft ones went to town on a button cell battery, but I have yet to figure out what tiny battery will charge up the old Carnegie.  Amazingly, the one I have is in pristine condition, right down to the original pins that hold the cover in place over the battery.  I will continue my search for the right one, but if anyone knows, please write in!  The Corocraft trees, by the way, take an “AG13” button cell battery.  GLOW!

Stay Tuned:  All the beautiful Corocraft trees!

Joy, joy! It lights up!

Corocraft "Cone" Tree, battery-powered

Hattie Carnegie, ready for the right battery!